Induction Cooking for Better Health

The answer to Better Health is exercise and the food we eat. Nutritious, low-fat, low-sodium meals reduce dangerous cholesterol cut unwanted calories and retain important minerals, vitamins and life giving enzymes. All of our fresh foods have a built-in natural goodness. But the wonderful health-giving values you paid dearly for at your grocery store may soon disappear in your kitchen. With old-fashioned conventional cooking methods, fresh vegetables must be peeled, boiled, or steamed, and subjected to high heat of the microwave, not to mention the use of cooking fats and oils. All of this results in the irreplaceable loss of a large share of the vital minerals, vitamins and enzymes that we need for better health.

       Induction Cooking creates wholesome, great tasting meals, without sacrificing vitamins, minerals and enzymes. Furthermore, the methods you will learn, in my cookbooks and throughout my website, thoroughly capture the wonderful flavors we expect in our meals. It’s possible because of this unique cooking method. Foods are cooked at precise temperatures, below the boiling point, in a vapor seal. This Ultra-Seal™ method of waterless cooking with Ultra-Tech II™ induction cookware is the secret that that retains vital nutritional values. By eliminating the need for peeling, boiling, steaming and microwaving, vegetables and fruits come to the table with a “garden fresh” taste, and meats are gently browned and cooked in their own natural juices, without the need for high calorie oils and fat. It’s a whole new experience in cooking and taste, and a key benefit for better health.

       Because food preparation is easy and efficient, waterless cooking with Ultra-Tech II™ induction cookware has become the preferred method of millions of home cooks and professional chefs who are dedicated to better health through healthier cooking techniques. My new cookbook "Cooking for a Longer, Healthier Life" contains exciting recipes that will bring nature’s goodness to your table every day.

Chef Charles Knight

How Induction Cooking Works?

An induction-cooker element (a "burner") is a powerful, high-frequency electromagnet, with the electromagnetism generated by sophisticated electronics in the "element" under the unit's ceramic surface. When an induction compatible pan is placed in the magnetic field that the element is generating, the field transfers ("induces") energy into that metal. That transferred energy causes the metal--the cooking vessel--to become hot. By controlling the strength of the electromagnetic field, we can control the amount of heat being generated in the cooking vessel--and we can change that amount instantaneously; the difference is that here, the heat is generated directly in the pot or pan itself, not in any part of the induction cooker.)

How Induction Cooking Works (Cont):

  1. The element's electronics power a coil (the red lines) that produces a high-frequency electromagnetic field (represented by the orange lines).
  2. That field penetrates the metal of the ferrous (magnetic-material) cooking vessel and sets up a circulating electric current, which generates heat. (But see the note below.)
  3. The heat generated in the cooking vesselis transferred to the vessel's contents.
  4. Nothing outside the vessel is affected by the field--as soon as the vessel is removed from the element, or the element turned off, heat generation stops.

Temperature Guidelines

No.

Setting

Function

Temperatures

Induction Cooking Guideline

1

 

Warm

100°F (38°C)

110°F (43°C)  Rendering chocolate, homemade yogurt 

2

Low

Warm

150°F (66°C)

Waterless cooking crisp, keep food warm for serving, pasteurizing, slow-cooking

3

Medium-Low

Simmer

180°F  (82°C)

Poaching eggs, simmering, stewing, braising, melting cheese, baking custards and casseroles

4

 

Simmer

210°F (99°C)

Eggs, waterless cooking, jellies and jams, hard-boiled eggs, baking, roasting after searing

5

Medium

Boiling

270°F (132°C)

Boil steaming, sauté, crepes, fried potatoes, gravies; candies, s'mores, roux

6

 

Boiling

300°F (150°C)

Sauté vegetables and seafood, breakfast potatoes, pancakes, and French toast

7

 

Browning

330°F (166°C)

Brown meats, stir-fry, sauté meat & poultry, grill sandwiches

8

Medium-High

Frying

360°F (182°C)

Deep fry in oil, chicken, fritters, fries, donuts

9

 

Pan-Broiling

390-420°F (199-216°C)

Quick browning and searing chicken, popcorn, pasta

10

High

Sear

450°F (232°C)

Quick brewing and searing steaks & chops, browning before roasting

See 5-Ply and 9-Ply full-body induction cookware at www.healthcraft.com

Chef Charles Knight

Cookbook Author - Radio & TV Cooking Show Host

www.HealthCraft.com | knight.cktocook@gmail.com 
1.800.443.8079 North America | 011.813.885.5244 International

1.813.390.1144 Cell

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