How to Poach Eggs
How to Poach Eggs
How to Poach Eggs

How to Poach Eggs

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Eggs Benedict

  • Toasted English Muffin
  • Fried Canadian Bacon
  • Poached Egg
  • Homemade Hollandaise Sauce

A poached egg is an egg that has been cooked by poaching in or over simmering liquid. This method of preparation is favored because a very consistent and predictable result can be attained with precise timing, as the boiling point of water removes the temperature variable from the cooking process.

If the eggs are at room temperature, the cooking time is usually 3 minutes 30 seconds. If the eggs are taken from a refrigerator, then a longer time is required, though the exact time depends on the size of the egg, and other factors such as altitude.

1¼-quart Sauté Saucepan with vented lid and 3-Egg Poaching Set

Steam poaching is applied to a method whereby the egg is placed in the stainless steel cup, suspended in the stainless steel rack over simmering water. To cook, the pan is filled with water and brought to a simmer, or a gentle boil. The vented lid will be closed to hold in the steam, ensuring that the heat surrounds the egg completely. The cups are often lubricated with unsalted butter or non-stick cooking spray in order to effect easy removal of the cooked egg.

Poaching, using our stainless steel egg poacher, verses poaching egg in a pan of boiling water (which is really a “dropped egg”), is a lot easier than any other method. No vinegar to mess with, no trying to make sure the egg doesn’t spread, no turning or flipping. This is a great invention and you can poach 3 eggs at a time.

Directions: Coat the removable cups with unsalted butter or non-stick cooking spray. Place the egg cups in the rack in a pan ¾ full of water. Bring the water to a good simmer over medium heat 275°F (135°C) then crack the eggs into the cups. Cover the pan and close the vent. If using my new tempered glass cover you can watch them cook as the top of the eggs turn from clear to white. Eggs will poach quickly, in about three (slightly runny) to four minutes (cooked through white) yolk runny like a fried egg. No fuss no muss. See Ultra-Tech II 6-Egg Poacher.

The result is very similar to the traditional coddled egg although steamed eggs are often cooked for longer, and hence are firmer. Eggs so prepared are often served on buttered toast.

Dishes with poached eggs

Poached eggs are used in Eggs Benedict and Eggs Florentine. See my Hollandaise Sauce recipe.

Poached eggs are the basis for many dishes in Louisiana Creole cuisines as Eggs Sardou, Eggs Portuguese, Eggs Hussarde and Eggs St. Charles. Creole poached egg dishes are typically served for brunches.

Several cuisines include eggs poached in soup or broth and served in the soup. In parts of central Columbia, for instance, a popular breakfast item is eggs poached in a scallion/coriander broth with milk, known as changua or simply caldo de huevo ("egg soup").

The Libyan dish Shakashouka consists of eggs poached in a spicy tomato sauce.

In Italy poached eggs are typically seasoned with grated Parmigiano Reggiano and butter (or olive oil).